The Rediscovery of Mathew Ellison Cook

By His Great-Grandson - Terry L. Cook
April 2005, Revised January 2006

cookterry@aol.com

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS: In genealogical research one thing leads to another.The rediscovery of Mathew Ellison Cook is no exception to that rule. It would not have happened without Laura "Bitty" Cook, my sister-in-law, making the fortunate discovery of a genealogical Internet posting by Carol Tramp, whom I eventually discovered is my half second cousin once removed. Carol lives in Wynot, Nebraska and is also a descendant of my great-grandmother. Carol's posting was a search for any knowledge of a Matthew [Mathew] Ellison Cook or his family. This opened the door for me to learn the name of my great-grandmother, Mary Rebecca Cross, and of her subsequent marriages to William G. Smith and J. C. VanCampen.This then led to my searching under the name "VanCampen" and finding a wealth of information in the National Archives because Mary Rebecca VanCampen had made application seeking a Civil War Military Pension based on her previous husband, Mathew Ellison Cook's Union Service. I found that another application for a pension was made on behalf of my grandfather, James Levi Cook, Mathew's son, filed by his uncle by marriage, Wiley Sizemore, who claimed to be his guardian. The National Archives provided a tremendous amount of information about my great-grandfather Mathew from those who actually knew him, but also provided information about my great-grandmother Mary Rebecca, and her parents, my great-great-grandmother and great-great-grandfather, Ellen M. Cross and Lewis Levi Cross. For all of this I am truly grateful.

Subsequently, during the summer of 2005 my wife Landa and I visited with Carol Tramp and her husband Norman in Wynot, Nebraska, and attended two family reunions with the Gregg and Gray families, who are also descendants of my great-grandmother Mary Rebecca from her second marriage to William G. Smith. We obtained pictures of my great-grandmother Mary Rebecca from these descendants and visited her grave at Wynot.

PROLOGUE: Previously all information about Mathew Ellison Cook recorded that he died at age 19, in 1864, fighting in the Civil War. My father, Harlos N. Cook, said that was wrong and that Mathew died years later at Marmet, WV while bringing his son J. Levi back home to WV, but he never knew where from, the circumstances of Mathew's death, when he died, where he might be buried, or anything about J. Levi's mother, my father's grandmother.As you will read, Mathew's life was short and very difficult, but he did not die during the Civil War as his parents were to discover and I was to rediscover with my research.

M

athew Ellison Cook, second son of James Wilson Cook and Deborah Christian Cozart, was born in Raleigh County Virginia (WV), during 1845. At age 17, he and his brother James Remley, who then was 21 years old, did as many young men of their time in Virginia - they enlisted in the Confederate Army to fight the Union Army in the Civil War. They traveled to Fayetteville, Virginia (WV) where on September 7, 1862 their service began. They enlisted for the duration of the war in Company "A" 22nd Infantry of the Confederate Army, under the command of Captain James A. Cook[1], a distant relative.

The two new recruits left behind their mother and father, an older sister, two younger sisters and five younger brothers. Only once thereafter, while on short furlough, did Mathew Ellison Cook ever again return to the home of his family and friends. [2]

Mathew and Remley served as bunkmates during early stages of the war, but were not together on September 19, 1864 when Mathew was captured by Union forces at Winchester, Virginia. [3]He was sent to Point Lookout, Maryland as a "Rebel" prisoner of war. During the next month he was given the option of either being confined indefinitely as a POW, or enlist in the U.S. Army to be supervised by U.S. military "Yankee" forces in service to the Union.On October 12, 1864 Mathew enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army to serve for three years. [4]He was assigned to Company "A" 4th Regiment U.S. Volunteers (Rebels), and sent to Fort Sully, Dakota Territory, a fort manned entirely by Confederate prisoners of war who were captured in battle to serve out their enlistments (in reality an informal prison sentences in the hands of "Yankee" military authorities). [5]Fort Sully, built in 1863 as a direct result of an uprising of Santee Sioux Indians in Minnesota, was located on the east bank of Missouri River, about four miles down river from the future capital city of Pierre, SD, and is now in an area within the boundaries of the Farm Island State Recreation Area. The fort was 270 feet square, built by soldiers stacking cottonwood logs one on top of another, much like in a log cabin. The floors of the buildings were dirt. Roofs were logged-over and then covered with dirt and brush. It was abandoned in July 1866, after only three years of use, because of the quarters being unfit for habitation.[6]Living in such poor conditions may have later contributed to Mathew's poor health.

Mathew did not communicate with anyone back home in West Virginia while serving the U.S. Army in the Dakota Territory. His family members were unaware of what might have happened to him.They did not know if he had been killed in battle at Winchester, Virginia on September 19, 1864 as was originally thought, and where he might be buried.[7] To his family and friends he had merely disappeared.

However, Mathew was very much alive and continuing his service in the U.S. Army at Fort Sully, Dakota Territory. Mathew served as a dispatch carrier[8] traveling between Fort Sully, SD and Fort Rice, ND until he was discharged at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas on June 19, 1866, after serving about 1 and 1/2 years in Union Service. [9] This was over a year after General Lee surrendered at Appomattox, Virginia on April 17, 1865, thereby formally ending the Civil War.

After his discharge, on July 8, 1866 Mathew wrote a letter from Dakota City, Nebraska to his brother Remley in West Virginia, which was when his family first became aware that he had not been killed in the War. He told his brother of "close calls" he had experienced in the service and of an injury to his leg and knee from a bad fall. He wrote that the injury kept him from being able to report for duty from time to time and how it would get better then worse. He wrote that in March 1886 doctors said he was suffering from scrofula.[10]

[Medline Plus Medical Encyclopedia, http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001354.htm, dated 4/13/2005, defines Scrofula as Tuberculous adenitis, an infection of the skin of the neck, most often caused by mycobacteria (including Mycobacteriumtuberculosis), in adults. Infection with mycobacteria is usually caused by inhaling air contaminated by these organisms. The bacteria spread throughout the body, and may cause rubbery enlargement of the lymph nodes in the neck (cervical lymph nodes) as well as elsewhere. If these are not treated, the lymph notes may become ulcerated, producing draining sores.]

On September 23, 1866, Mathew wrote from Dakota City, Nebraska to his father, James Wilson Cook, apologizing for having not previously written to him and made excuses that he did not want to write until he was discharged from the U.S. Army. He told about being a dispatch rider for the past eighteen months and about the disease of his leg from scrofula or scurvy. [11]

Following his discharged from the Union Army, Mathew did not return to West Virginia, but went to work for Col. Barnabus Bates, Postmaster, Dakota City, Dakota Co., Nebraska, for more than a year carrying mail from Dakota City, Nebraska to Woodbury, Iowa. He also worked on Col. Bates, farm. Col. Bates said he "was a man of all work. "[12]

During his trips delivering mail to Woodbury, Iowa, Mathew became acquainted and fell in love with Mary Rebecca Cross, who, at age 15, was working in a local hotel.

After meeting Mary Rebecca, Mathew quit working for Col. Bates and moved about six miles north where he went to work for Mary Rebecca's father, Lewis Levi Cross[13], who was called Levi, on the Cross homestead farm. That farm, located on the east bank of the Missouri River, consisted of 155 acres at Civil Bend, is just south of Elk Point, SD. [14] Currently much of that land is covered by the Missouri River that has now moved eastward to follow a new course. Only a small sliver of land remains of the original homestead.

Six months later, on January 1, 1869 Mathew and Mary Rebecca were married in a ceremony officiated by Henry Carpenter, Minister of the Gospel. The wedding took place at the Civil Bend home of her parents, Levi and Ellen M. Cross, in Union County, Dakota Territory.A record of the marriage of, "[Blank Space] Cook to Mary Cross" is recorded in page 10 of the Register of Marriage Licenses and Marriages in Union County, Dakota, dated January 1st A.D. 1869.[15]Mary Rebecca was a few days short of being 16 years of age, having been born on January 28, 1853, and Mathew was 23 years old. The couple lived with Mary Rebecca's parents throughout that summer, and then began housekeeping, which lasted for only about a month, on what was known as the "Snow Farm"[16] at Elk Point, South Dakota.[17]On August 22, 1869 following an accident to Mary Rebecca of an unspecified nature, she gave early birth to a son, James Levi Cook, who was named for her father Levi Cross.[18]Mary Rebecca was only 16 years old.Dr. Earl, the local doctor, arrived soon after Ellen M. Cross and Mrs. Hamlin had delivered the baby.[19]

The couple moved back in with Mary Rebecca's parents after the baby's birth so her mother Ellen could care for J. Levi and also nurse a very weakened new mother.[20]Because of Mary Rebecca's poor health Ellen was to care for the child, along with her own twins born just a year earlier, during the first one and one-half years of J. Levi's life.

However, even before his discharge from military service in 1866, Mathew's left knee began swelling and caused him great pain. [21]This resulted in a rapid deterioration of his health.He began suffering greatly from pain and continuous swelling of his knee, which soon caused him to be completely lame and unable to walk without help. [22]There is no record of a physician's formal diagnosis to confirm the cause of his illness, but depositions from family and friends who knew him said he suffered severe pain and a crippling from an illness he contracted during his military service in the fall of 1864, they called "scrofula, scurvy and white swelling."[23]

To say Mathew suffered is probably an understatement.A friend Alexander R. Beavers said, "the knee kept getting worse and worse all the time until finally he got so he could not go around at all only as he was helped around. The knee was swelled just as tight as it could be swelled without bursting.I never saw anyone in as bad a fix as he was in. That the pain was so great that when ever he moved he would scream as though he would go into fits. "[24]

Mathew had accumulated about $360 during his military service and while working for Col. Bates, which he spent for medical treatment and for living expenses during the time he was unable to work,[25] which was at least a year.[26]According to Alexander R Beavers, for two years Mathew could do nothing and was unable to get around at all.[27]

After J. Levi was born Mathew was becoming progressively more seriously ill and more greatly handicapped because of his diseased leg. According to Mary Rebecca's mother Ellen Cross, he also was becoming jealous of his wife. Because of his lame condition he was unable to leave the house and Mary Rebecca "liked to have company and go about. He [Mathew] was lame and could not go, and she was young and of a lively disposition and fond of company."[28]

On October 29, 1870 Mathew wrote his brother Remley to say that he had grown tired of the West and wanted to return home to West Virginia to see his family. He asked for Remley and his father to send $50 to pay for the trip. Mary Rebecca had already told him that she would not come with him.[29]Because of Mathew's progressing illness the last letter he wrote was in such a shaky handwriting it looks as if it was written by a very old man, not a 25 year old.

On March 13, 1871[30] unable to accomplish the task for himself because he could not walk, Mathew arranged for his friend Tom Beavers, the son of Alexander Beavers, and another young man to go to the Cross home, remove J. Levi by force if necessary and take him and Mathew to the train station, where they were placed in care of the conductor to begin their long journey back to West Virginia,[31] Mary Rebecca and her mother tried to prevent the men from taking the child but were unable to do so. This taking was done during the absence of Levi Cross, Mary Rebecca's father, or he would have tried to stop them. [32]

Mathew almost made it home, but not quite.Leaving the Dakota Territory on March 13, 1871, after two months of travel, in early May 1871 he and J. Levi made it to the Browntown (Marmet), WV home of Mathew's niece, Rachel O,Neal and her husband James D. Jarrell. Rachel was the daughter of Mathew's sister Ellen Cooke O,Neal. Mathew could make it no further. He was very ill and the condition of his leg was so deteriorated with infection that it had spread throughout the entire left side of his body. Drs. Comstock, and Patrick from Charleston, WV; and Dr. Daniel Myers from Browntown WV, decided that there was no choice but to amputate his leg in hopes of keeping him alive. They performed the surgery, but nine or ten days later, on May 27, 1871, Mathew Ellison Cook died.He was only 26 years of age.[33]Remley Cook said, "The doctors said that there was not a bit of sound flesh on the side of the body, the side on which the leg was amputated, and there was a lesion on the same side [that] was the size of a goose egg and awhile after he died it became even larger. There were two other lesions about the pit of the stomach. They were small and became much enlarged before his death.[34]

Several days before Mathew's surgery, both his father Wilson Cook and brother Remley traveled to Browntown and visited Mathew, but his father went back home before the surgery was performed. Mathew was left in the care of his niece Rachel O'Neal Jarrell, at whose home he was staying. He died before his father could return. Mathew was "laid out" by his niece, who also supervised his burial in the Browntown Cemetery.[35]The grave was not marked with a tombstone, but according to both his father and brother his grave was only pailed (or paillings) (?).[36]

EPILOGUE:

J

ames Levi Cook was only nineteen months old when his father took him from his grandmother, who hadcared for him since birth, and his mother to began the long train journey from Elk Point, Dakota Territory back to West Virginia. It is hard to imagine how Mathew with his lameness and severe pain could have looked after such a young toddler. He was so incapacitated and in such unbearable pain it is likely that he was unable even to care for himself, much less a young child. Probably because of Mathew's illness, it took almost two months for them to make the trip to Browntown (Marmet), WV. After Mathew's death his brother Remley took J. Levi home with him and raised him as if he were his own son.Early on in J. Levi's adult life he carried mail on his back across the mountains to towns near Slab Fork, WV, and later had a logging business.J. Levi grew up to become a successful businessman in Raleigh County, WV, where he built a hotel and became the first Mayor of the Town of Lester, WV, where he lived for most of his life. He died at the home of his daughter Eunice Cook Milam at East Kingston, WV on October 14, 1949 at age 80 years. He was buried in a church cemetery at Lester, WV, at a church for which he had donated the land on which it was built.J. Levi had married twice. His first wife was Martha Etta Cannady, who gave him five children, one daughter and four sons. His second wife was Idella Brooks Acord, my grandmother, who gave him a daughter and a son - my father. Both marriages ended in divorce.

Mary Rebecca Cross remarried only forty days after Mathew died. It is unlikely that she even knew Mathew was dead. Also, she was probably pregnant at the time with her second child John Lewis Cook/Smith. On July 3, 1871 H. W. Chase, Justice of the Peace, performed the marriage ceremony between her and William George Smith at Sioux City, Woodbury County, Iowa. [37]After 42 years of marriage Smith died by what was recorded as an accident on the way to town at Highmore, SD on June 7, 1913. A newspaper article reported that, "Whether it was a case of heart failure, or an overdose of tablets containing acetaulid, of which he had when he left home about 8:30 in the morning. He had earlier complained of gas on his stomach before he left home, and it is not known just how many tablets he had when he left but perhaps six or eight. None were found in his pockets. "He was found on the ground beside his wagon where the team had been stopped and the brake on the wagon was firmly set. Also, several slight scratches were found on his face. A coroner's inquest was held but the exact cause of death was not determined or recorded, but it may have been heart failure. [38]Smith went by the nickname "Buckles" and was said to have weighed 340 pounds. The newspaper reported that Mary Rebecca and Smith had eight children, four boys and four girls. The fact that she also had a ninth child, another son, J. Levi Cook, was not reported.

Mary Rebecca married a third time on April 18, 1918 when F. G. Oswotherly, Justice of the Peace, officiated the marriage ceremony between her and J. C. VanCampen. [39]She was 65 years old at the time. VanCampen had been living in the South Dakota State Soldiers, Home at Hot Springs, SD, off and on since November 21, 1916 and was discharged on April 23, 1918 following his marriage to Mary Rebecca. He was readmitted about three months later, on August 3, 1918, where he lived until his death on November 15, 1919.[40]Mary Rebecca lived with her daughter at Wynot, Nebraska until she died on June 12, 1927 at age 74.She is buried beside one of her grandsons at the Wynot Public Cemetery located at the south edge of town, up on a beautiful knoll overlooking the town.[41]

John Lewis was born to Mary Rebecca in late in 1870 or in early 1871. Like J. Levi, John Lewis was named for Mary Rebecca's father, Lewis Levi Cross. However, because of the timing of this birth and Mathew having left the Dakota Territory in early March 1870, it is inconclusive whether John was the son of Mathew Cook or William G. Smith. Because of John's birth occurring late in 1970 or early in 1971 is almost certain that Mathew was never even aware that Mary Rebecca was pregnant with a second child when he left the Dakota Territory. Mary Rebecca probably did not even know herself at the time.During John's entire younger life he was known to be the son of William Smith, as confirmed by every U.S. Census up through 1910. The 1880 U.S. Census for Union County, SD lists John L. Smith as being 9 years of age, the son of William G. Smith, head of the household.[42]In the census of 1910, even after he was a grown man and head of his own household, he was listed as John L. Smith, being 37 years old, living with his wife Fronie and their children in Lyman, Van Metre, South Dakota.[43]Regardless, it is probable that John was the son of Mathew Cook, even though Mathew never knew he had a second son and John probably did not learn that he was Mathew's son until after William Smith's death in 1913. At that time John was 41 years old and married with children of his own. The 1920 U.S. Census, taken as of January 7, 1920, seven years after William Smith's death, was the first one to list John as John L. Cook, age 48, born in Nebraska, as living with his wife Fronie and their children in the Traphill District, Lester Precinct, within the Town of Lester, WV[44], where it just so happens that J. Levi lived for most of his life.John apparently moved to West Virginia to be closer to his brother. Since John L. was a Smith for most of his younger life, it is very unlikely that he would have merely up and changed his name to Cook at such a later date in life unless he were to belatedly find out that his father was indeed Mathew Ellison Cook.

William Smith's June 7, 1913 obituary lists J. L. Smith as his son[45], but Mary Rebecca's obituary on June 12, 1927 states that she had two sons by Mathew Ellison Cook, identifying them as James Levi and John L.[46] Sylvia Gregg, who is a great-granddaughter of Mary Rebecca and William Smith, said for many years the Smith children, including John L., were unaware of their mother's earlier marriage to Mathew Cook.She said the family was quite upset to learn of Mary Rebecca's prior marriage. It is probable they learned of it only after Smith's death in 1913.Gregg sources say that after William Smith died, John L. (Smith) Cook, along with his wife and children, moved to WV to be closer to his Cook family. Mary Rebecca's June 12, 1927 obituary said John L. Cook was residing in Huntington, WV. The 1930 U.S. Census confirms that John Cook, age 57, with his wife Florie and children were living in Huntington, Cabell County, WV. [47]

Neither my father Harlos Cook nor his sister Eunice Cook Milam ever mentioned to anyone in the immediate family that during their childhood while living with J. Levi in Lester, WV, during the time of the 1930 Census, did his brother John ever live in that town during the same time. However, both acknowledged that J Levi had a brother named John.

NOTE: To see a family tree of Mathew's descendants please connect to

http://www.tribalpages.com/tribes/fordtuf



[1] Certification of Service Record, Adjutant General's Office, War Department, November 28, 1885.

[2] James W. Cook, November 19, 1890, interviewed by D. D. Duke, Special Examiner Deposition "C", Case of Wiley Sizemore, No. 290,998.

[3] James R. Cook, November 19, 1890, interviewed by D. D. Duke, Special Examiner Deposition "B", Case of Wiley Sizemore, No. 290,998.

[4] Handwritten Copy of Mathew Ellison Cook's Discharge, June 19, 1866, made by Wiley Sizemore on March 23, 1882, provided as a certification to the Investigation Division, Pension Office, Department of Interior.

[5] Certification for Record of Service, Adjutant General's Office, War Department, July 24, 1882.

[6] Eagle Butte News, Old Fort Sully, January 7, 1971.

[7] Letter from Mathew Ellison Cook to his brother James Remley Cook, dated July 8, 1866.

[8] Letter from Mathew Ellison Cook to his father James Wilson Cook, dated September 23, 1866.

[9] Certification for Record of Service, Adjutant General's Office, War Department, July 24, 1882.

[10] Letter from Mathew E. Cook to his brother James Remley Cook dated July 8, 1866.

[11] Letter from Mathew E. Cook to his father James Wilson Cook, dated September 23, 1866.

[12] Col. Barnabus Bates, June 27, 1891, interviewed by C. M. Knight, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "A", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[13] Ibid.

[14] Homestead Certificate No. 725, filed May 16, 1877, Certificate of the register of the land office at Sioux Falls, Dakota Territory, General Land office of the United States, a copy recorded Vol. 2, Page 184, Union County, Dakota.

[15] Register of Marriage Licenses and Marriages in Union County, Dakota, page 10, dated January 1st A.D. 1869 by Henry S. Carpenter, Register of Deeds and Minister of the Gospel

[16] Alexander R. Beavers, June 30, 1891, interviewed by C. M. Knight, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "D", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[17] Ellen M. Cross, February 23, 1893, interviewed by F. C. Sharp, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "A", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,993.

[18] Mary R. (Cook) Smith, June 23, 1891, interviewed by C. M. Knight, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "B", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[19] Ellen M. Cross, February 23, 1893, interviewed by F. C. Sharp, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "A", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,993.

[20] Ibid.

[21] Letter from Mathew Ellison Cook to his father James Wilson Cook, dated September 13, 1866

[22] Alexander R. Beavers, June 30, 1891, interviewed by C. M. Knight, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "D", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[23] Ellen M. Cross, February 28, 1893, interviewed by F. C. Sharp, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "A", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[24] Alexander R. Beavers, June 30, 1891, interviewed by C.M.M. Knight, Special Examiner of the Pension Office, Deposition "D", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[25] Letter from Mathew Ellison Cook to his brother James Remley Cook dated October 29, 1870.

[26] Mary R. (Cook) Smith, June 23, 1891, interviewed by C. M. Knight, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "B", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[27] Alexander R. Beavers, June 30, 1891, interviewed by C. M. Knight, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "D", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[28] Ellen M. Cross, February 28, 1893, interviewed by F. C. Sharp, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "A", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[29] Letter from Mathew Ellison Cook to his brother James Remley Cook, dated October 29, 1870.

[30] Ellen M. Cross, February 28, 1893, interviewed by F. C. Sharp, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "A", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[31] Alexander R. Beavers, June 30, 1891, interviewed by C. M. Knight, Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "D", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[32] Ellen M. Cross, February 28, 1893, interviewed by F. C. Sharp, Special Examiner, Bureau of Pensions Deposition "A", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[33] Wiley Sizemore, November 18, 1890, interviewed by D. D. Duke, Special Examiner, Bureau of Pensions, Deposition "A", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[34] James R. Cook, November 19, 1890, interviewed by D. D. Duke, Special Examiner, Bureau of Pensions, Deposition "B", Case of Wiley Sizemore, Guardian, No. 290,998.

[35] James W. Cook, November 19, 1890, interviewed by D. D. Duke, Special Examiner, Bureau of Pensions, Deposition "C", Case of Wiley Sizemore, No. 290,998.

[36] James W. Cook statement dated June 9, 1893, to request from James A. Watson, Special Examiner, Bureau of Pensions, No. 290,998

[37] Certified True Copy of Marriage Certificate, dated November 4, 1892, State of Iowa, Woodbury County

[38] Certificate of Death, Highmore, Hyde County, South Dakota, June 7, 1913, Cause of death recorded as "Sudden Accidental Death Cause Unknown from Coroner's Report, Certificate dated July 8, 1913.

[39] Certificate of Marriage, Fall River, South Dakota

[40] Statement from South Dakota State Soldiers, Home, Hot Springs, SD, dated December 14, 1925.

[41] Record of Marked Graves, Wynot Public Cemetery, Wynot, Nebraska.

[42] 1880 U.S. Census, Jefferson, Union County, Dakota Territory, enumerated on June 10, 1880.

[43] 1910 U.S. Census, Lyman, Van Metre, South Dakota.

[44] 1920 U.S. Census, Traphill District, Lester Precinct, within the Town of Lester, WV.

[45] Obituary of William G. Smith, June 1913, Highmore S.D. News.

[46] Obituary of Mary Rebecca Cross, June 1927, Cedar County News.

[47] 1930 U.S. Census, Cabell, Huntington Precinct, WV.